In 2014, Heather and Don Morecombe, Caroline Van Den Berg and David Adams produced a history exhibition for the village fete. The exhibition consisted of over 20 display boards covering the major aspects of the history of the village.

Hinton St George History Group

The exhibition included over 300 old photographs, an illustrated timeline together with relevant books and facsimiles of important documents. The project also included recorded memories of a number of long term residents.

We would like to thank Rupert Lewin in giving open access to his extensive village history archive. Much of the content of the exhibition is being transcribed onto the church touchscreen as an ongoing project.

The original project has developed into the Hinton St George History Group, which is an informal organisation presenting occasional history events in the village.

If you are interested in helping the group or are able to provide historic information please contact Heather Morecombe. Call 01460 76330 or email: morecombes@gmail.com

HMS Victory – November 2017

For our first presentation on Saturday 25th November 2017 in St. George’s Church we were treated to a fascinating talk by Clive Thorne, a local resident and trustee of HMS Victory, who was piped ‘aboard’ by Nigel Hayler on his Bosun’s Call. Clive’s excellent talk gave an insight into the events surrounding the Battle of Trafalgar and the challenges faced today in trying to preserve this, our most iconic warship, for posterity.

We were delighted that this first offering by Hinton History group was so well-supported and an excellent evening was enjoyed by all, no doubt aided by the complimentary Navy rum and ship’s biscuit.

An evocative atmosphere was created by soundtracks of creaking timbers and sea shanties with the church bedecked with flags and pennants. Numerous naval artefacts, loaned by Hinton residents, made a very interesting display which was much appreciated before the talk and during the interval.

We would like to thank all those (too numerous to mention here) who helped to make this a most successful evening.

What have the Roman’s ever done for Hinton?

Friday, 9th November 2018, St George’s Hall

On Friday 9th November, on one of the most inclement nights of the year, battered by high winds and torrential rain, we were treated to an exceptional talk by John Smith, archaeologist and historian, on the Roman Army in Somerset.

He brought history to life with his collection of replica clothing , armour and weapons and, demonstrating his vast knowledge and understanding of the era with subtle humour, he also managed to debunk a few myths along the way.

We are very grateful to John and his wife for making the journey from Wiltshire in such weather, even managing to avoid a fallen tree on the A30 near West Coker. Thanks also to all in the audience for venturing out on such an awful night to join us.

Our next talk entitled ‘Literary Somerset’ will be on Friday 22nd February, 2019 in St. George’s Hall where we are delighted to welcome, as our guest speaker, the celebrated author and poet James Crowden.

James’ talk is “an intellectual roadmap of Somerset from Roman times through Anglo-Saxon Wessex up to the present day of more than 300 writers”…. focusing, in the second part, on war poets including a Somerset war poet of the Western Desert, John Jarmain, who was killed outside Caen, Normandy in June, 1944.

We do hope you will be able to join us to “explore the literary highways and byways of Somerset” together.

A date for your diary in 2019 – Literary Somerset

Friday 22nd February at St George’s Hall, 7.00 for 7.30pm

Our next talk entitled ‘Literary Somerset’ will be on Friday 22nd February, 2019 in St. George’s Hall where we are delighted to welcome, as our guest speaker, the celebrated author and poet James Crowden.

James’ talk is “an intellectual roadmap of Somerset from Roman times through Anglo-Saxon Wessex up to the present day of more than 300 writers”…. focusing, in the second part, on war poets including a Somerset war poet of the Western Desert, John Jarmain, who was killed outside Caen, Normandy in June, 1944.

We do hope you will be able to join us to “explore the literary highways and byways of Somerset” together.